Nature’s opportunity

In September 2018 Botswana’s Ministry of Education, the Department of Non Formal Education invited me to New Xade in the Central Kalahari to run a workshop for San carvers. I met with the participants - 17 men and women - at the local school.

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The essence of an elephant

Creating sculpture is my first love, but since coming to Botswana, I’ve developed another: working side by side with local artists to explore the messages and images embedded in the tree limbs and roots left behind by both nature and people.

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Treasuring nature’s textures

Creating a unique wood sculpture means working in harmony with the materials nature has provided. You have to pay attention to the way a tree has grown

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Tools of the trade

Every woodworker has a most-loved tool. Mine is a small adze, in the Botswana language Setswana, called a petlwana. I use it when I first find an old piece of

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Working with the grain

While my first love is Mopane, sometimes a piece of wood from another tree offers itself irresistibly to the sculpting process. Last month, Maun friends Desiree and Pierre Sharp pointed out

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Mopane : a love affair

The mopane tree (Coloposphermum mopane) is a natural marvel. It thrives on the heat and sandy soils of the southern African lowveld. Its butterfly-shaped leaves provide fodder for browsing animals,

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Old wood tells us stories

Old wood tells us stories. In the ever-changing natural world, living trees are silent observers, responding to sun, wind, wild creatures, moisture from beneath the soil, and replenishing rain. Quietly,

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